Citations & Sources

How do I find the full text of an article if I have the citation?

A full citation usually looks like this. With this information, it is easy to locate the full-text in one of the library's databases or in print.

Roe, E. (2011). Surprising Answers to Rising Sea Levels, Storms, Floods, Desertification, Earthquakes and Ever More Environmental Crises in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Journal Of Contingencies & Crisis Management, 19 (1), 34-42.

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What is a primary source?

There are many types of primary sources in the library. The term "primary source" can be used in various ways depending on the discipline. Generally, first-hand accounts are considered primary sources, and materials created at a later time which analyze an event are considered secondary sources.

The right strategy for using primary sources often depends on the topic.

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What is a citation?

A "citation" is the information used to trace a book, article, or web page from a referral back to the original published source.  A citation is also a means of giving credit to individuals for their creative and intellectual works when those ideas support or influence others' research.  Citations are found in the bibliographies of articles and books, in databases, and often in online sources that are dependent on research, such as Wikipedia.

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What is an annotated bibliography?

A bibliography is an organized list of sources (journal articles, books, government documents, websites, etc.) on a specific subject area. Citations in this organized list include the bibliographic information of each source, such as the author, title, and publication information.

An annotation is a note, explanation, or commentary added to a text, image, or other data. 

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Finding Scholarly Articles

OneSearch is a good starting point for your academic research. Begin your search using keywords. Once you see the results list, select "Peer-reviewed Journals" under the drop-down menu on the left that says "Availability."

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Is this source or information good?

Evaluating Information: The CRAAP Test

When you search for information, you're going to find lots of it... but is it good information?

You will have to determine that for yourself, and the CRAAP Test can help.

The CRAAP Test is a list of questions to help you evaluate the information you find. Different criteria will be more or less important depending on your situation or need.

 

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